Saturday, November 10, 2007

756- FIGHT BACK

A MESSAGE TO ALL UNAPPRECIATED GUEST WORKERS
Fight back. Go to your home newspapers, recruiting agencies, friends and anyone connected to supplying workers to the unappreciative CNMI, and tell them....
Tell them not to even consider coming here anymore. Tell them to spread the word about the unfairness of the warped system is here. Tell them to go to forwarded moving countries with progressive economies and stay away from this backward moving place. Tell them this place is reverting back to an era of discrimination that the rest of the civilized world moved out of years ago. Tell them how unappreciated they will be if they come here. Tell them that after all their time spent here they will be discarded. Tell them that there is no future here, that their families don't count and are not considered as important people here. Tell them all you have learned while being here. If you tell them, that will help them decide not to come here, and be belittled too.
I'm sure there places that would welcome hard working, quality skilled workers who bust their asses for the small wages paid and do so proudly. I'm sure there are places that will be thankful for the diligence and hard work you show here. I'm sure there are better places then the raciest and ungrateful CNMI. I'm sure you can find a better deal then this one they have put in place with their new 'screw you' law.
If the Philippine government, alone, placed a moratorium on supplying workers to the CNMI for 5 years things would drastically change, why these crybabies here would be lost, unable to function in any capacity, even less then the nimble rate they exist on now. Tell 'um, fuck-off, kiss my ass good-bye, see you later, when and if you ever manage to wake up.
Guaranteed to jerk the chain...
That's all!!!
.....GED.....

11 comments:

lil_hammerhead said...

As far as the problem goes.. I agree with you. I don't know about the solutions though. A moratorium won't help us or them.

It's sad though.. they're invited here by the local residents to work, and then their punished by local residents for some percieved harm they've done to the community for being here. It's madness. It's idiocy.

glend558 said...

Its the CNMI..

glend558 said...

Lil..I want to take your last comment in the first paragraph to task..
"A moratorium won't help us or them."
I was not suggesting that a moratorium be enacted but only what the effects would be.. Now the other part, the "won't help us or them" It would seriously screw the CNMI, having no pool of available workers for local businesses here and how about new investors and businesses realizing there are no workers available, what would they do? I'll tell you what, they would do nothing here!
But on the other hand workers choosing not to come here to this repressed place may find much better oppertunities elswhere. This would be a huge benifit to them verses coming here to only be told to get screwed after a period of hard work and then to be told go home you are ruining 'our' island..We don't want you after all. I wouldn't come here knowing what I know. I would never invest in a business here that was to be micro-managed by the government who was telling me who to hire and demanding I run my business according by their rules.. The simple way around this numbnut law is simple EITHER DON'T EVER COME HERE..OR..GET THE HELL OUT.
This will pretty much nail the coffin closed to new businesses coming here!

Pragmatic Plato said...

Regarding the US House Bill: One interesting side effect of our government bitching and complaining and stalling the US Senate bill is that now Guam has hopped into the picture and will have no cap on the ability to hire foreign workers. The CNMI begged Guam for help. The Governor got what he wanted. The non-resident 5 year provision was removed but they added guam into the mix. Now I hope that all of the guest workers in Saipan apply for the many jobs available in Guam.

BOycott Porky's!

PP

glend558 said...

I think whenever the final bill is passed we will be as suprised as we were with our latest elections. There are some things in it now and some things not in it now that may quiet possibly change. The actions being taken by the CNMI government now will help reinforce the idea that some more changes are needed. They are watching...

lil_hammerhead said...

Sorry Glen.. I wasn't suggesting that you were suggesting that a moratorium should be enacted. I was just putting that statement out there. That is my feeling.

I agree with you that the CNMI needs to be able to hire non-res workers. I also submit however, that the CNMI, and its businesses have not done nearly enough to hire and train workers and have enacted every anti-private sector measure possible to exclude normal local working people.. i.e.-the minimum wage.

glend558 said...

Quiet the contrary, Lil, The local workforce does nothing to try to accept jobs. The businesses would prefer local help.. We went through that before.. It is the local workforce that is lax and dosen't show up for work, you cannot place this blame on the shoulders of the employers. You also keep referring to training the local workforce, why does that become the responsiability of the employer? What are schools, colleges, tech institutions and other trade schools for? Why hire and train? Who is going to do the training? Does the employer have to hire trainers to get trained employees? Why not hire someone already trained in a institution that is established to specially train them? There are these places!
Let the people who want to work get the proper schooling and then take their qualifications and apply for an approprate job in that field. You know, Like the rest of the world does..
As for the miminum wage, if not for the fed. gov. there would never be raises here, these people would have slaves if they could get away with it... Even now most businesses who have dependable and worthy employees pay above the miminum wage already. What makes you think they would replace them with someone who needs training, is undependable to show up everyday and and wants more money then the existing employee, just because they're local?
The bottom line is .. Locals need to get an education, have a will and want to work and be dependable. If that is accomplished I will promise you there won't be this problem anymore.
I personally wish that this could happen for the betterment of everyone.. But if no one addresses the problem it will never be solved with arguments...

lil_hammerhead said...

I respectfully disagree Glen.. the few workplaces I know of, that pay well over minimum wage for startup jobs have many local employees, who have been there in many cases for over a decade. Banks, insurance companies, a couple hotels, and a particular auto shop come to mind.

I agree with you that it's not the responsibility of the government to train people. The reality is, however, there's been little incentive for an individual to invest in training that may garner them a $3.05 an hour job. Additionally, if we are to ween local businesses off of alien labor.. the only way that is going to be accomplished, as we stand here today, is to provide a cooperative training program. There is a large population in the community that must be trained. In many cases, they don't have the means for a variety of reasons to make this happen on their own. The raising of minimum salaries to a reasonable amount and facilitation of a cooperative training program, will go far towards bringing local people into the workforce.

With regards to slave labor. Historically, it has been businesses who have tried to get away with whatever they could. This includes slavery, child labor, lack of safety, etc. It is only government regulations that thwart these practices, and I believe only the government is in a position to make the corrections necessary in our private sector. If we left it up to businesses, they'd be hiring from Bangledesh and paying a nickel an hour.

glend558 said...

Lil, I stated, It's not the responsibility of the employer to train the employee, ( a certain amount of orientation and familiarizing to the work is acceptable) you said it's not the governments, I don't think its either of them, its up to the individual themselves.. If there is a financial hardship there are ways to overcome that with loans, grants, scholarships or the good old way of starting at the bottom and advancing up the ladder as many, many people have done, etc. I really don't think we are very far apart on this issue if any at all. I think if there was a concentrated effort to make the local population available as a trained and skilled workforce there would be jobs available for them. There would be absolutely no need to bring in guest workers if this was the case. On the other end of the scale many of the local's don't want many of the jobs currently occupied by guest workers.(this is true in the mainland US also, as shown by the hiring of many migrant workers) Farmers, maids and other minial jobs come to mind, there will always be a demand for guest workers in these areas. My guess the prevailing mindset of a cushy, irresponsiable government job has created some of these problems today and now that is no longer a viable option. This may take some years to go through the changeover but it will correct it's self as people realize they really will need to 'work' instead of simply being handed a job and paycheck...
I have always maintained, as was true in my working experience, is that the employer prefers locals to imported help. Now the task is to place the locals in the position to avail themselves of these jobs. This can only be accomplished through the above mentioned process. Please do not mistake any of my comments as being anit-local workers, as they are needed and desired. This is what my ideas and comments should be construed as.
Also needed is the public and open addressing of this issue to help come to grips with the facts and solutions of the problem, but this cannot be legislated or forced upon the employers, it needs to be a grassroots development from the ground up, whenever all this is faced with reality.
Have a nice day!

saipanboonieman said...

glen, youre right yhat the resident workforce does need to change its work ethic to face the realities of our economy. but you are wrong in saying it is not the responsibility of businesses to help train locals for jobs; it is clearly stated, though inadequately enforced, in the labor regs.

and thanks for directing me here. youve been added to my favorites list. :-P

glend558 said...

Anytime boonieman, your welcome.
We'll stay with different points of view on the training subject even if the regs state that...